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  • Dave Page

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    August 9, 2022 at 6:16 pm
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    I hadn’t thought to look at it as anxiety was thinking frustration due to type of bark. He does as @Mike said eury does.

    Gives me something to think about. It did get worse when moved the kennel where he could better see what we were doing

    Wife said he’s quiet all day, and only does it when I’m home and outside. It is worse when he can see me but not get to me.

    As for giving him something to do, he doesn’t show much interest anything other than big bone.

    As for his chain link fence reaction it’s only when driving/traveling so it’s tolerable.

    He has ~200sf of kennel space plus dog house attached on outside.

  • Dave Page

    Member
    August 6, 2022 at 5:19 pm
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    No problems with iPhone, or Microsoft on desktop.

    Just MacBook

    I have removed all cookies, cleared cache, and history.

    Still getting same thing.

    Everything on it is up to date.

    Links that work, k9-1 in upper left, find a dog trainer, and the enroll.

    Links that give “got lost” are “about k9-1 and log in link.

  • Dave Page

    Member
    March 8, 2022 at 6:30 pm
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    If working with a high drive hunting line, not familiar with dog breed you have, some hunting breeds need time to settle in and bond.

    My curs need a couple weeks as puppies. If older need quite a bit longer.

    Play works well.

    Need to a semi-solid idea of end goal then figure a way to incorporate the beginning parts of your goals into the play session.

    For One of mine was to bring carry things for me. (Bring squirrel or whatever to me) Started with play sessions with picking up objects being ready to catch as soon as it was dropped and praising for it, quickly progressing to doing same with my shoes, and having move farther distance. I switched what we were working on often during a session.

    I use a philosophy that every interaction, play, petting, etc with a puppy is training and proceed accordingly.

    They also need lots of mental stimulation.

    Like I said not familiar with your breed it could be the intensity of exercise and amount of mental stimulation may not be enough for it which I see you mentioned.

    Maybe a food filled kong to get it to settle?

    Most hunting line dogs that use sight as well as Nose are rather impulsive, ready to go at a moment’s notice, and some have been known to go until they drop/run themselves to death. 12 +hrs baying a hog is a long time.

    Maybe I provided you with some useable information.

  • Dave Page

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    November 16, 2021 at 9:47 am
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    One of the things I did in the beginning was sit with them in parking lots, Ace is one who needed it the most, rewarding calm/proper behavior.
    He got where people even leaned against the truck and he wouldn’t react.

    Socialization through obedience training in businesses that allowed it, and all the environments I could.
    Looking back my mistake’s leaving him on his own in the truck while I went in a store yet he can be seen.

    Dawned on me; even though dark, and mirror tinting is illegal, if I could find removable window shades so people can’t see in “Out of sight, out of mind” scenario. Gonna look in to it. Maybe it’d help. Either that or they gonna have to stay home. These guys don’t take change very well. Breaking the patterns and Having to leave them at home so much lately I think is one of the reasons for their some of their acting out past couple months.


  • Dave Page

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    November 14, 2021 at 12:16 pm
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    I do realize much will depend on breed and temperament of the dog. Most of mine usually have the attitude, leave me alone I leave you alone.

    I spent hours sitting in parking lots, rewarding the right behaviors for them to learn not everything is a threat, and sit peacefully while people pull in, get out of their vehicle right next to us, only to have it undone in 15 minutes, or so while I’m in a store. One of mine likes to rest his head, on the door panel next to the window, and I have seen people notice him there when they are getting in their vehicle, and bark at him thinking it funny when he comes alive, or comment dog’s vicious because it reacted. I’ve had to intervene, and try to educate many times. Personally I feel it is tantamount to teasing, and considering whether it would even be ethical to condition a guardian type breed to not react in such an instance, as it goes against nature.

    Trying to figure out if there is a way to condition, that wouldn’t be so time consuming, or something that could be done in early life so a dog wouldn’t be so hypervigilant and overly reactive, for the next week or so afterwards. Usually after an incident they will start seeing anyone even getting near as a threat, and overreact.

  • Dave Page

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    November 5, 2021 at 8:42 pm
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    I got some spray sheild in my cart. Looked like it was gonna go wrong, which was why I yelled to get their dog, he broke when I yelled, and started advancing on him, so spray shield would have come in handy if he hand’t yielded.

    Trying to find a 8 foot fiberglass core flag whip as a distraction to add to order. Thought it might make a good distraction for interlopers.

  • Dave Page

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    November 3, 2021 at 8:50 pm
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    I got an airhorn coming to see if it helps. First run of the season was too wild for my comfort. Really hate to use pepper spray with owners so close as last ended being.

    Raw unedited.

    Has shown where need to do more work. Mostly training myself. Mine seem to loose patience after a few close calls. We had more close calls than normal.

    Many moved during the summer took couple dog packs with them.

    I got complacent, and wasn’t as prepared as should have been. Ended up being unprofessional.

    Some dogs have been added on the normal route I didn’t know about who don’t know what’s up. Mine did very well the first, and second close call.

    I never spoke to my dogs during it.

    Out of habit all the “no’s” were being directed at the one charging us trying to break its focus. Mine knew what to do and held their ground to let me deal once I jumped off to confront the dog. (He charged out from behind a vacant house hyper focused on my dogs and silent. I don’t think it ever saw me until I threw my phone at it and physically got in the way.) Third not on video was way too close for comfort. It Dodged the leashes I use to whip out to keep dogs back, even trying to bolo its legs, and it kept coming.

    https://youtu.be/slj4FrdREUM

  • Dave Page

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    March 14, 2022 at 10:21 am
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    Your statement “never want your dog to have to advocate for herself” with brief explanation would be an awesome one.

    Thinking snippets probably have to be longer than 30 seconds.

    (Sat watching pack movement, and patterns for a while this morning. Would be neat to observe more often how they condense, reconnoiter, search, call one another, and regroup if they hadn’t gotten/wouldn’t get so dangerous.

    Searched for calf, tried to separate one from momma but cows called each other and grouped closer, and deciding they were out matched this go round.

    At least none found way through my fence today.

    If pattern continues they’ll be back day after tomorrow.)

    Trying to figure direction they may live. Heading out at different times and different directions. Don’t think all belong to same people.

  • Dave Page

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    March 12, 2022 at 9:46 am
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    I should have said the punishment portion of the article isn’t recommended. That can create a Chet type dog who’s always stressing it’s going to get in trouble, and going into defensive mode. FSDT all the way. My fault.

    Each is going to be an individual and have to work with it based on that.

    Micro-lessons incorporated in the play. Pre-Mack city!

    Playing tug example: an out, a quick sit, even if just couple seconds then a release to continue. Gradually extend the time.

    First couple months with mine obedience training was all incorporated into play, none was traditional obedience due to the energy.

    Gotta think outside the box. Something might try that worked with one of mine to burn off energy and as bonding exercise:

    Once had him doing a decent down would walk off (5 yards in beginning to 15 yards to 100 yards) give a “come” command and start running. Once he caught up we would run a bit more, stop and lots of praise, or run and grab a tug and go into tug play. Repeat. Several sprints like that throughout the day burns some energy.

    Try to set them up for success by watching body language and give the come command before they would come out of the down



  • Dave Page

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    November 16, 2021 at 10:50 am
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    I’ve had a few issues over the past 10-15 years. They were few and far between. Had more this year alone than had in my first 45 years.

    I’m Learning to protect, protect, protect, hypervigilance.

    Any idea where the labeling of a dog as vicious, if it won’t tolerate provocation, came from?

  • Dave Page

    Member
    November 15, 2021 at 3:58 pm
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    If it’s warm weather usually leave truck running and a/c on unless I’m within sight. Used to clip them to truck on 15 foot lead, but had to stop that as well. Seen as open invitation to pet.

    (Funny story, and valuable lesson for me from few years back.

    Was working on pressure washing a cabin in bfe. Had Chet with me letting him run cause he won’t get far from me, deadend road, fall weather, no rented cabins close. I ran out of gas. When I got gas can out my truck guy standing in back of his pickup across the road asked me to come over. He owned cabin he was parked at and decided to make a trip up. When I called Chet to a heel the guy flew back into bed of his truck.

    He had tried to come over where I was, said he saw working dog signs, and dog but thought they were just show. 😂 Chet never bit him, but bayed him back, then laid down behind my work truck to watch him.

    Man didn’t say, and i don’t recall asking how long he had been in the back of his pickup waiting for me. He said I hit your dog, but he stopped when I got back past middle of road.

    But I guess he wasn’t going to take chance.)

    I’m 50+, almost always had a dog, and never had to deal with what experiencing now.

    I probably just need to accept, for now it is what it has become, tourist area is no longer compatible/safe area to carry my dogs with me. May not be fair to the dogs who are used to going several times week but safer for them.

    At livestock auction last week, out of 60+ vehicles 10 or so had dogs either in trailers, back of pickups, or in cab. No one paid attention to them.

    I’ve had occasional issues over the years but not more than I could tolerate. Our State never shut down, and people from areas that did lock down flocked in, and with it came more provocation towards my dogs, more close calls than I could tolerate.

    Edit: dogs are considered personal property here and last I looked illegal to break out a window to get them and we can legally have dogs in front.

    My lesson: Signs don’t mean nothing to some folk so plan accordingly. 😂

  • Dave Page

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    November 14, 2021 at 1:22 am
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    Although I’m getting in the habit, I didn’t normally lock my truck so most could have easily let them out if they thought they were “rescuing.”

    In 5 years, only a couple I’ve seen, and watched, thought they were trying to “rescue.” Clients kid wanted to open door to say hello.

    Lot of it’s been plain aggravation such as, barking, or lunging towards + barking at the dogs etc. one of several instances i pulled up to a store one day, someone walking out saw him in truck, and started barking at him while walking by. Maybe it’s some kind of new challenge or something I don’t know 🤷🏼‍♂️

  • Dave Page

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    November 10, 2021 at 8:30 pm
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    I think I finally found a 6foot.
    Been trying to find a luge with a 6 foot pole to reach past my dogs head just in case another incident like the last one that day.

    Plus I can use to put a flashing light on and hold in the air to warn cars coming over hills .

    Things we do to enjoy time with out dogs 😀

  • Dave Page

    Member
    October 27, 2021 at 8:40 pm
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    Thanks.

    Takes me a while to figure out how to explain it without going psychology nerd 😆

    I think that’s one of the reasons my dogs seem happy to do obedience is I try to keep it interesting and fun. Early on If they seem to be stressing I’d back up, try and different route, or add a substitute stress to alleviate the primary stressor.

  • Dave Page

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    October 19, 2021 at 7:57 pm
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    Wish I was decent at creating charts.

    I look at the aggressive drives as being on a continuum. Easy to move back and forth.

    As humans we are conditioned with what I call anchors; similar to a conditioned response but more emotional based. From human psych we know frustration is result of a myriad of emotions, eg., anger, resentment, due to lack of fulfillment of basal needs.

    Tug flitting on ground -> Prey drive (frustration built by holding them back increases emotional response.) Emotional response adds strength to the command, as well as the praise, and once the 2 are conditioned it has “anchored.” In other words the command itself can bring about the emotional state, and response just from being uttered.

    If a dog has had such a command anchored, and it is placed in a unfamiliar situation in which it’s unsure how to react, said command properly anchored will kick in prey drive.

    Let’s say it is a situation where the dog needs to protect its owner. If the dog is confused the anchored command can be given which, in simple terms brings to bear the requisite drive and emotions. It’s only a matter of milliseconds from prey drive to defensive drive. The video of the black wolf going after the dog: the dog goes from prey drive as the wolf walks away and slides into fear drive, back to prey, and back to fear in moments.

    Milton Erickson type stuff.

    To clarify mine have never gone beyond what is necessary. They have never chased down a stray. They just run them off.

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