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  • Allie McCain

    Member
    October 13, 2021 at 12:37 am
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    Have you seen the drive’s chart? How would the drives that you are describing fit in there?

    What do you mean by release commands? Like do you not use them at all because you are going to pp? How does not using them tie into personal protection?

    We used 2 different words for Storms play bite on the tug and her pp. I am under the impression from the streams here and through my own personal preference that I don’t want want to turn play into aggression. I want Storm to be aggressive out her natural desire to protect her loved ones. We use play for bite building, but she isn’t that big on tug, its not her favorite, so she will have to bite organically helped. The idea that I LOVE about FSDT is that it takes a natural emotional response and builds it up. If we endorse that and help her feel strong in her follow though she will be more effective. It has little to nothing to do with play, a few of the dogs we are working with wont play tug at all….but if you touch their momma they are ready to go….THAT is what we are molding….some need more help that others. I wouldn’t ever want storm to think protection is a game. I want her to be a serious as she can be in that moment with no hesitation and no taboo…so we (my husband and I) don’t play rough or argue etc in front of her, I never want her to have mixed emotions about her inner circle.

    https://dogtraining.world/live-classroom/intro-to-foundation-style-personal-protection-training-4-0/aggression-drives-in-protection-training/

  • Allie McCain

    Member
    October 10, 2021 at 4:52 pm
    434
    14

    Super interesting, thank you for sharing!

  • Allie McCain

    Member
    September 23, 2021 at 3:23 am
    434
    14

    I have a fire hose tug and it’s pretty tough, I don’t feel like it’s safe to play tug with, even with Storm. I use it in the pool because it floats or for fetch. We like bite suit tugs, but if you feel creative, I have my clients take old knee-high socks and fill them with cotton or old towels and tie them off at the top and those make excellent starters, they are nice and soft to encourage the dog to feel confident putting their mouth on some thing, and they are long enough to keep your hands safe. If your dogs are already confident tuggers the bite suit tugs are pretty inexpensive. I have never used French linen but since Judy suggested it I’m sure I’ll try it. 😊

  • Allie McCain

    Member
    September 23, 2021 at 3:18 am
    434
    14

    I can’t believe I missed this!!!! Shoko! You are so awesome for following your heart and seeking further education! Heidi will repay you for your efforts in love snd relationship!!!! One thing to consider, even though phase 1 training (+R) is a great way to bond, learn communication, and enjoy each other, it isn’t all there is to leadership. Keep watching and definitely read the leadership article, and post questions! Dominance and leadership is on going and is the heartbeat of conflict free and fulfilling relationships with our dogs. Here is a great video to watch and remember that we, the humans, also fall under A, B, or C not just the 4 legged family members. Hope this helps. You’re in the right place! https://youtu.be/owjyJh2NlfE

  • Allie McCain

    Member
    August 31, 2021 at 8:24 pm
    434
    14

    Beautiful and super cool that you caught it on camera!!!!!!!!! Omg! I almost died when she did it! She is so precious!

  • Allie McCain

    Member
    July 19, 2021 at 1:08 pm
    434
    14

    I think this looks really good. I like that you specified that TRAMP and PPT etc. are advanced add-ons that require more knowledge and practice! This is super exciting!

  • Allie McCain

    Member
    June 2, 2021 at 4:26 pm
    434
    14

    Yes thats correct: Stormy sit, no, sit (correction)

    Id love to see more videos! Also, I strongly suggest watching the personal protection stream before doing pp work. It will give you a good understanding of how it works and thereby help you advocate for your Blitz and know whether the trainer understands the difference between sport work/prey drive and actual protection drive. I would also suggest watching the the 5.0 video about police dog training. 😍 Questions about PP would be awesome to post on the live Q and A

  • Allie McCain

    Member
    May 29, 2021 at 8:41 pm
    434
    14

    Hey! So good to see you and Blitz posting again! I have a couple questions: When do you use the ecollar? What commands does he have ecollar corrections for?

  • Allie McCain

    Member
    May 9, 2021 at 1:30 pm
    434
    14

    I posted a reply in the pack howl ☺

  • Allie McCain

    Member
    May 3, 2021 at 11:53 pm
    434
    14

    I have not experienced this to the scale you are, but I used to live in the desert here and wild dogs were a real problem. I had two pit bulls and they would re direct at each other when they couldn’t get through the gate to get to dogs passing by. I don’t recall them being escalated due to the dogs marking but certainly Rogue (my dog now) would be aggravated by that. I wonder if there are any old cowboy tricks to keeping dogs away from property…….like the old urinating on garden fencing to keep deer out…(that never worked as far as could tell….but in theory it sounds nice). This is a tough one and I will be sure to follow your updates. They do make attack vests for dogs…..maybe have your kids wear one during walks/carting?

  • Allie McCain

    Member
    May 1, 2021 at 12:19 am
    434
    14

    I usually have people with puppies that young start obedience and then practice socialization with the following in mind (this is part of an article posted for my clients on the community page….mainly to explain why we don’t like dogs parks…I think Puppy classes are rather harmless….most training facilities and pet stores that offer training also offer “happy hours” which is like puppy play date hour….that is may be something worth checking out to avoid conflict in training styles.)

    SOCIALIZATION

    NOUN.

    1. the process of learning to behave in a way that is acceptable to society.

    “preschool starts the process of socialization”

    There is often confusion that “socializing our dog” means: letting people (strangers) pet them and letting them play with other dogs at dog parks or meeting other dogs on leash.

    Most people want to be able to take their dogs places with them and have a productive and calm experience.

    Steps to achieve this:

    1) practice obedience in low stim environments leading up to more difficult environments

    2) Have our dog’s back: practice environmental awareness so that we can prevent unnecessary or counterproductive interactions

    3) Just say “no” to strangers touching a dog in training.

    Things to ponder regarding interactions with strangers and other dogs:

    1. Socializing with and accepting strangers is not a natural behavior for dogs. Although dogs do make friends and some dogs do enjoy playing with others, asking them to enter an enclosure with a high stimulation level is a set up for failure, and for our dogs to be put on the defense. It does not give them a natural and proper social introduction sequence, and since body language is everything between dogs, it can escalate quickly if a dog is unsure or if a dominant dog enters to meet other dominant dogs, already there. This is also true when dogs are leash. Their whole countenance is altered by the handler’s presence and attachment to the dog.

    2. Running around at the dog park does NOT equal socialization. Socialization is the ability to behave in socially acceptable ways in social settings. We don’t learn table manners playing at the park, we learn them at home at the dinner table, or etiquette classes. Playing with other dogs can be a part of social skills (if done in a controlled environment) but it doesn’t have to be. Socialized dogs are dogs that can be in public, that are not nervous around people moving by, cars, stimulation etc. Socialization DOES NOT MEAN: accepting of strangers touching them. It means they can maintain manners in a social setting without becoming stressed. If we allow stranger to handle our dogs ESPECIALLY if our dogs exhibit calming signals or avoidance, it can not only begin the warning and bite sequence, but it can damage our dogs trust in us to keep them safe. Most dogs do not appreciate strangers sticking their hands in their faces, bending over them or even making hard eye contact. Of course, genetics plays a huge part in the dogs’ reactions. IF a dog does enjoy interactions with strange humans, and they are allowed to interact with people on the walk, it makes it difficult and unfair for us to correct them for being excited and/or reactive when a person walks by. If they associate strangers approaching to excitement it is counter-intuitive to having a calm and collected dog in public settings; as well as making a formal heel in high stimulus situations much harder to train.

  • Allie McCain

    Member
    September 3, 2021 at 1:24 pm
    434
    14

    I think it could become extinct or neutral if it was not reinforced enough times. What if you start naming the mimicking of the behavior, Like Ziva Copy or something….I am trying to think of a new behavior for my girls……..Roguie knows roll over, maybe Ill see if Storm will learn roll over from seeing her sister do it enough times!

  • Allie McCain

    Member
    August 29, 2021 at 1:09 am
    434
    14

    Thank you! Good point! Yes I can see how that would be confusing, about corrections…..GOOD CATCH….and yes the free should be known first also. This is sooooo helpful Judy, thank you! Super important to make it as clear as possible! You’re the best! Stormy says HI!

  • Allie McCain

    Member
    June 2, 2021 at 9:38 pm
    434
    14

    I would watch this first.

  • Allie McCain

    Member
    June 1, 2021 at 7:16 pm
    434
    14

    So he in theory receives the correction on the “no” instead of n the repetition of the command? What made you choose to do it that way instead of using the “no” as a conditioned punisher? (conditioned punisher meaning nothing happens on the “no”, the dog learns that the “no” is an opportunity to avoid a correction as the correction comes with the following repetition of the command if he doesn’t make an adjustment on the “no”….think of the conditioned punisher as a fire alarm>>>>nothing actually happens to us when we hear a fire alarm…but we have been conditioned to know that we must do something to avoid the fire)

    Correcting on the no instead of the repetition could potentially lead to some side effects like the dog guessing the behavior, avoiding the behavior or receiving corrections for being confused. Also, what if “no” is not appropriate, like in heel or a recall? How does he receive corrections then? It may help him with his confidence to make that adjustment. Have you watched intro to phase 3? Also here is the command structure article.https://dogtraining.world/knowledge-base/command-structure-chart/

    <b style=”font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit;”>

    Command Structure Chart

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