Forum Replies Created

Page 1 of 8
  • Allie McCain

    Member
    June 6, 2022 at 6:46 pm

    @JoseC is working this out with Moose to produce a retrieve and hold into the heel position

  • Allie McCain

    Member
    May 27, 2022 at 11:42 pm

    This is cool! You, your wife and Senna will take over the nose work world!

  • Allie McCain

    Member
    March 30, 2022 at 6:44 pm

    💜

  • Allie McCain

    Member
    March 14, 2022 at 1:27 am

    Where do I start?! I have made some videos about some of this stuff for my clients. I’ll share with ya! Mostly rants after conversations with clients after wild experiences.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XdBnAMlRejU

  • Allie McCain

    Member
    March 5, 2022 at 5:44 pm

    Hey! That would be an awesome thing to create! Would you send me words/terms that you already have and then words as they come up?I will put one together and then post it for further input! you can also search words in the magnifying glass

  • Allie McCain

    Member
    February 20, 2022 at 8:43 pm

    I’m happy to help in anyway that I can. Sometimes talking it out is more expeditious, you can also ask questions on the q and a…you can even go on live to discuss this case…it would for sure help all of us, we can never talk too much about leadership!

  • Allie McCain

    Member
    February 18, 2022 at 8:51 pm

    Time outs or social punishments are usually ineffective, as you are are finding. Dogs don’t understand retro-active punishment, and even if you “catch them in the act” punishing an emotional response always creates negative side effects. For example, if my Stormy wants to lunge at a stranger because she FEELS protective, punishing her for that emotional response isn’t going to teach her anything. In fact, it can cause escalated emotions and negative associations with the walk, me, strangers etc. So instead I teach her to heel, and give her the command, and if she breaks the heel command to lunge at someone or eat bubble gum off the side walk… she gets a correction for disobedience (which our dogs can understand).

    Its always best to not be reactive to our dogs rather be proactive. Putting the crate by your bed (or where ever Alvin sleeps) and having him sleep contained will make it so that he can’t engage in many of the behaviors you don’t like, and that have to potential to become dangerous. Management and leadership and scheduling outlets is very important for high drive and working dogs….any dog, really. Alvin’s play biting is actually obtrusive behavior in an attempt to control the environment and the interactions between you and him and your partner.

    Is Alvin allowed on the furniture? Does he free feed? How much food does he eat and when? Does he always (even in his crate) have access to water? Does he have toys left out? This is a pretty important subject and one that I think would be easier to discuss with a conversation so we can set up a plan, FSDT, for you and Alvin. I would be happy to set up a zoom call with you, and if you are comfortable recording it we could post it here so everyone has the opportunity to give feedback.

    I think it is awesome that you are trying to do everything you can to give Alvin the best life. He is super lucky to have you. 🙂

  • Allie McCain

    Member
    February 17, 2022 at 10:31 pm

    awesome! sounds like he just needs to be on leash for a bit an acclimated, also a place command is very helpful and having a bed there will help him feel at home

  • Allie McCain

    Member
    February 17, 2022 at 1:38 pm

    We have to be careful with Rogue in new places as she will mark. Sounds like Nugget is practicing the same behavior, especially if there are other animals that live in the home. We keep doors closed to bedrooms etc, and keep Rogue on leash for the first few visits, and make sure to make a point of going potty outside. This usually takes care of it….but we never truly give her free roam, just to be safe.

  • Allie McCain

    Member
    February 17, 2022 at 1:26 pm

    Teaching a command (like you are starting to do) is good. Definitely practicing intentionally, first, will help him be more successful in the moment. This way you are working towards true obedience. Most importantly, before focusing on obedience, is understanding leadership and how to practice it with out conflict.

    Also, are you scheduling play? Playing tug in a productive manner can be very useful in building relationships with working dogs and helps you bond while controlling the game. The bite building video is great to watch. Being male or female (as a handler) doesn’t matter as much as the dogs prior associations with body language, punishment and their emotions in that moment. While clickers can be useful I prefer to use my voice and a natural, loving tone to mark behavior and build relationships. Dogs are emotional animals and thrive on the appropriate relationship being built. Especially working line dogs. Here are some good videos to watch.

    Leadership is key!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wn47825cpdI

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1FSF66m_2Yw

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8eOWnU9q64E&t=14s

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fq2GrVUf3Yg&t=41s

  • Allie McCain

    Member
    February 11, 2022 at 12:56 pm

    I agree, it is a bonding opportunity my girls are taught to roll on their back/side and hold their feet for trimming….I dont think they “love” it but they arent afraid of it and they always get cookies after lol. Storm does love her Muzzle, like I’m sure she likes being naked more than anything but she associates her muzzle with doing awesome stuff and working hard, which she loves, even though she also wears it to things that suck, ie: going to the Dr. We make a point of having fun with it too….like going out on trail or playing in the mud with horses…..which is for sure my favorite training session EVER!

    https://youtu.be/wlfD0J8qWuA

  • Allie McCain

    Member
    March 9, 2022 at 11:26 am

    I think any working dog or high drive dog (or any dog really) has the potential to create outlets that are not favorable when we don’t provide ones that are.

  • Allie McCain

    Member
    March 9, 2022 at 1:52 am

    Hey Sharon!!!!! Congrats on the new puppy!

    I agree with Dave in that high drive dogs relationship is everything. Training has little or no effect with out relationship unless the dog is interested in that very moment. Play is great, letting the win, a lot, sneak training in with premack as the reward. I would also consider a run instead of a kennel, with maybe a kiddie pool in it, or some other sensory development. Fishing for chicken or hot dogs in a kiddie pool teaches the dog how to hold their breath and utilize his nose under water (vomeronasal organ) which is the coolest thing EVER! Its super fun and a great bonding experience, productive play, like recall games, stepping over trotting poles, going through kitty tunnels etc, all create a mind and body connection for the dog, helping him practice decision making and coordination at the same time….which is very draining and can help him settle faster. I have videos of all of these games if you would like to see examples. They are super fun for us and our dogs. I’d make sure the pup has water when he is kenneled, and that he gets to cut loose when he gets out. 🙂

    The article from the airdale guy mentioned not punishing disobedience, rather punishing unwanted behaviors. I would wholeheartedly disagree. Behaviors are often the results of emotional responses, drive, and lack of education (or being young), punishing them for these things does not teach the dog anything, rather it can cause a myriad of side effects including a negative effect on the dog handler bond. Punishing disobedience is is exactly in line with operant conditioning and ABA. Although we want to make sure we are sure the dog has gone through a solid phase 1 and escape conditioning.

    He also refers to retroactive punishment, which can cause advocacy against the handler especially in stronger drive dogs. This is copied from the article “However, if you come home and find that your Airedale chewed a pair of your slippers because they were bored, you need to punish them. Make sure you’re being firm and strict, not angry, but you still need to let the dog know that that’s not okay. For me that’s always meant a stern voice and a smack on the nose (depending on how old the dog is); for you, it might be different.”

    I would watch the habitation and management lectures for a FSDT approach on how to solve these types of issues, instead of utilizing hands on the dogs face.

    https://dogtraining.world/knowledge-base/management-plans/

    Management Plans 4.0

  • Allie McCain

    Member
    March 2, 2022 at 2:26 pm

    ok I will DM you to set something up

  • Allie McCain

    Member
    February 18, 2022 at 4:30 pm

    *

Page 1 of 8