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    It sounds like to me that the pit bull was displaying defense of his territory on the couch. And being able to stake claim to wherever he wanted to that he was the dominant figure in the household. When the visitor tried to get the dog to move he jumped at him to show this is mine and you can’t have it. And when the owner, who was not established as the leader, broke them up was bitten because now the aggression has been redirected. And being a pit bull, with their strong jaws and bite force, to get the dog off the visitor there is no telling how she managed that without causing some kind of pain to the dog.

  • Chad Mashburn

    Member
    March 2, 2022 at 11:20 am in reply to: Member's Create Our Code of Conduct Here
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    I feel like the IACP has a more well written and easier to understand list. Where the APDT is broken down a little better but doesn’t really have a list of the rules. APDT has about 2 or 3 good rules then talks more about complaints and how to file a complaint. Also maybe I missed it but I really didn’t see anywhere in APDT about the dogs quality of life.

    1. Conduct themselves in a honest and trustworthy manner

    2. To treat every client and every animal with respect.

    3. Do not take on any client or service in which you are not qualified or competent about.

    4. Continue educating yourself on training techniques and animal behaviors.

    5. Be transparent with client about your training methods.

    <font face=”inherit”>6. </font>Confidentiality<font face=”inherit”> agreements must be signed before any media is posted of clients and/or their dogs.</font>

    <font face=”inherit”>7. Do not conduct or promote any actions in which will hurt the training business or provide </font>falsities<font face=”inherit”> that is not supported by years of research.</font>

    <font face=”inherit”>8. Do not provide opinions of a dog’s future based on what you can or cannot do, always seek the help from a more qualified professional before requesting a dog be put down.</font>

    <font face=”inherit”>9. Be selfless – This business is about improving the quality of life and relationship between an owner and their dog, NOT about just filling your pockets.</font>

    <font face=”inherit”>10. Do not publicly slander or bash </font>colleagues<font face=”inherit”> in the profession for their training methods. </font>

  • Chad Mashburn

    Member
    March 2, 2022 at 11:32 am in reply to: Member's Create Our Code of Conduct Here
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    I agree with all your points. I like #4 safety first, it goes right along with know the tools that you are using. You could seriously injure an animal if you’re not using the proper equipment in the right way. I also really like #7, since I am a police officer I see way to many dogs running around off leash and and an owner yelling at the dog to come and it almost getting hit by a car or actually getting hit by a car. The laws are set in place for safety reasons not just to make a dog owner’s life hard.

  • Chad Mashburn

    Member
    March 2, 2022 at 11:26 am in reply to: Member's Create Our Code of Conduct Here
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    Your points are on point, lol. Number 2 is a good one, using the tools that you know how to use properly. I also like #3 that is very similar to my # 9 its about the relationships not about filling our pockets.