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Forum Replies Created

  • john galloway

    Member
    February 27, 2019 at 1:20 pm

    I will Probably use the cotton ball idea. We have progressed from scent work inside the home and garden; out into the local church grounds.

  • john galloway

    Member
    February 26, 2019 at 7:32 am

    Hello, thanks for the reply’s. I have been using cinnamon; putting the cinnamon inside bottles with holes punched into the lid. Like I said it’s not serious scent work; just adding some variety.

  • john galloway

    Member
    August 1, 2018 at 1:55 pm

    <p class=”MsoNormal”>Hello, it has been a long time since my last post regarding Holly, so thought I would give an update. Since the last post I have continued with Holly’s obedience and leadership exercises; I would do this regardless of behaviour problem or not. Regarding obedience I have no issue, she is a responsive and well-behaved dog. Holly’s problem was that she did not like to be approached by strange dogs, dogs she does not know, she still doesn’t. But I no longer view this behaviour as a problem; Holly just doesn’t like strange dogs approaching her. I now manage this behaviour by keeping her on lead, whenever other dogs are loose. If a dog approaches I stay relaxed and in control of the situation; if the other dog approaches slowly and avoids physical contact, Holly is now fine with this. If the other dog gets too close, Holly will snap at the dog making it back-off. I don’t correct this I either ask her to sit, in the foundation style, or I call her name, breaking her concentration, and bringing her attention onto me. Excitable dogs can be difficult, Holly doesn’t deal-well with quick movements, dogs running excitably around her, jumping at/onto her. She will respond with aggression, growling and snapping. I keep the situation relaxed and calm, and if possible engage the dog’s owner in conversion and explain the situation. I don’t want the owner to call their dog away, so I ask the owner to walk with me; teaching Holly that aggression does not make dogs go away. I let Holly decide when she feels comfortable enough to make contact with the dog, this can be after three or four meetings with the same dog; some dogs she never makes contact with, apart from a brief sniff, but the aggression stops and she can walk calmly alongside them. I am happy with her progress, and she makes a great pet/companion.</p>

  • john galloway

    Member
    June 18, 2017 at 2:04 pm

    Hopefully, I will be posting a success story very soon. Probably write a progress post, sometime next week.

     

  • john galloway

    Member
    June 15, 2017 at 7:45 am

    Hello Charlotte, thank you for the links. I will have a look through them over the next few days. Thanks, again.

  • john galloway

    Member
    May 25, 2017 at 1:50 pm

    I will definitely be keeping her on lead, when other dogs are near, until the problem is resolved; and I am confident it will be. Luckily, I live near to a country park with plenty of open spaces, so can take her out into the fields and still exercise her properly. She is well-trained off lead, which is why I was surprised at her running off and attacking the other dog.

    I’ll let you know how she progresses.

  • john galloway

    Member
    February 4, 2017 at 8:29 am

    I am not teaching a dog this, my dog already has door control. The question was given at the end of a training/socialisation class, for participants to study.

    yes you could teach a ‘wait’ command.

    Yes, it could be used as part of a leadership programme.

    So do I.

     

  • john galloway

    Member
    January 7, 2017 at 2:16 pm

    I was thinking ‘dog body language’, so the family can recognise when it’s time to back-off. And maybe introducing leadership exercises and some basic obedience, but most importantly the kid needs to learn how to properly interact with the dog and the whole family need to understand why he was bitten. Like you say, the family will know best if they are able to follow through or not.  Thanks for the reply.

  • john galloway

    Member
    January 5, 2017 at 7:58 am

    Brilliant!

  • john galloway

    Member
    November 11, 2016 at 2:13 pm

    A year or two ago the BBC made a documentary about an Arctic Wolf family. The interactions between the presenter, film crew, and the wolves where amazing. With a complete lack of fear the wolves where so curious.

  • john galloway

    Member
    October 11, 2016 at 1:18 pm

    Nothing looks more impressive than off – lead heel work.

  • john galloway

    Member
    April 26, 2021 at 7:48 am

    Ha, I like the Batman & Robin analogy easy for clients to understand.

  • john galloway

    Member
    May 23, 2017 at 2:36 pm

    Hello Sharon, and thank you for replying. I mean ‘cat like’ in the sense that she is quite ‘prickly’ or ‘edgy’ around dogs.
    I take your point about the Bishon Frise being difficult to read, he needed a haircut and so looked like a ball of wool. I have thought about this before, and she does have problems with French Bulldogs and large heavy-coated breeds such as Newfoundlands. Not so much German Shepherds or Huskies.
    I think the lack of early socialisation has definitely had a negative effect.

    The incident on Sunday, just caught me by surprise. She shot straight across the grass and attacked the dog. I will say, it probably sounded a lot worse than it was, what with all the growling and yelping. I think that’s what panicked the other dog owner. If it had been just me and the dogs, probably wouldn’t have been half as bad.