• Michael D’Abruzzo

    Administrator
    May 2, 2012 at 7:07 am
    954

    If you can give an example of a specific situation it will help. Not sure if you are writing about separation anxiety, a neurotic dog, a dog in the presence of the owner yet physically separated, etc..

    Also, what is the specific problem about not “calming down”. is the dog licking itself, howling, chewing things, pacing, etc..

    Anxiety can be tricky because besides genetics it can often be about finding the “loose end” that isn’t being addressed to start moving the dog in a forward direction. Either way I do believe with the WORST case scenarios it may help to put a dog on a med to take the edge off while the dog gets used to a more predictable plan that doesn’t feed into the problem. For instance if a dog is at a point that is so anxious it will not even bother with a high value treat when in the anxious state – medical intervention can be helpful.

    There are many underlying things people do (or do not do) if not addressed make it hard to improve an anxiety problem.