• Shannon Hargis

    Member
    June 12, 2014 at 12:50 am
    18

    I’m sorry, your link wasn’t working for me.

    A few things come to mind.

    – He may already be getting his restless spirit out some other way (playing with other dogs, chasing squirrels etc.) If you make playing with you the only option for getting out his restless spirit, you will have much better luck.
    – He may sense your frustration(when he grabs too high) and it discourages him from engaging.
    – The object does not appear “real” enough for him to chase. Try using the flirt pole and making the toy make jerking movements away from him to frustrate and build drive.

    I have had a similar problem with dogs before. I had to make the play sessions very short and try to frustrate the dog by not letting him bite the tug. Try to end the session before he becomes uninterested. Using a tug on a short rope works best for this. My first couple session ended up being about a minute long. Then once he does get a bite make it very fun and if he lets go frustrate him with jerky movements away and then end the game. You should be able to lengthen your sessions as you see your dog gets more of a drive. Once he has more of a drive then you can start letting him “win”(drop the tug while he is pulling on it) if he is holding onto the right spot(the tug being the right spot, the rope or your hand being the wrong spot).

    Have you tried squeaky balls?