• Judy

    Member
    August 25, 2016 at 1:11 pm
    263

    Hi Steve! Welcome to the forums! First I want to let you know that this is all Norma god behavior. Dogs, especially the type you have can be very protective and territorial over their own territory. If you bring her out and she’s not showing this same behavior outside of her own “territory” then you are probably right when you say that it is territorial. It may also be a combination of territorial aggression and barrier frustration aso well. Medication is something that vets like to give to fix issues they actually may not understand themselves at time. Medication isn’t going to help with territorial aggression, or with barrier frustration. Maybe dogs with anxiety is could help calm but that is a whole separate thing. I believe that there may be times when medication is necessary for certain situations, but it really isn’t a quick fix for normal dog behavior. The only medication that would help calm a dog would be a sedative and that is and would be counter productive and not helpful. Anxiety medication, isn’t going to help territorial aggression. Also know that certain medications can highten aggression and have an opposite affect. I have worked at an animal hospital for over 13 years and most times, medication isn’t the answer.

    First and most importantly you need to review the leadership section of the self help page.  As is noted in that section, it is one of the most important and overlooked sections. You have to develop a good Lear shop relationship with your dog in all aspects that are mentioned. Then you need to start on the right track for obedience. This takes time and patience. You want to set you dog up for success and not failure. You should do this starting the training sessions in a “teaching” environment. This means with no distractions. One step at a time. Then we can work out way up to obedience when someone comes over like putting her in a place away from the door.

    For now just know this isn’t anything abnormal and with the right leadership and relationship with the family and the dog, you will be able to achieve what you want.

    Think of it this way too, if some man comes on your property that you feel is a threat and you two go at it and start exchanging words, and it gets heated, your wife may having a hard time breaking it up and intervening once it has started. But if your wife knows that that same guy is walking down the street it’s easier for her to get you under control before you’re adrenaline starts pumping. Same with the dogs. Timing is super super important. Look at the video of the leash reactivity that is posted during one of our classes. You will see the progress during class with the dogs. It is a good example of how timing for everything is so important. It will be very difficult to get your dog to listen right now when she is already topped out on adrenaline.

    Just be patient and work one step at a time. You have to build a good foundation before you can build upon it or everything will fall apart.

    We can help you every step of the way but you need to start off one step at a time.

    Start with leadership, get back to us and let us know where you fall for each category listed is your dog provided for, entitled, unprovided? Then we can help you tweet that and start you off on the first steps of a training plan.

    I will review you post again to see if there are any little details I missed and will get back to you again, but for now this is a start. I just didn’t want to leave you without at least a quick response.

    🙂