• Dave Page

    Member
    October 19, 2021 at 7:57 pm

    Wish I was decent at creating charts.

    I look at the aggressive drives as being on a continuum. Easy to move back and forth.

    As humans we are conditioned with what I call anchors; similar to a conditioned response but more emotional based. From human psych we know frustration is result of a myriad of emotions, eg., anger, resentment, due to lack of fulfillment of basal needs.

    Tug flitting on ground -> Prey drive (frustration built by holding them back increases emotional response.) Emotional response adds strength to the command, as well as the praise, and once the 2 are conditioned it has “anchored.” In other words the command itself can bring about the emotional state, and response just from being uttered.

    If a dog has had such a command anchored, and it is placed in a unfamiliar situation in which it’s unsure how to react, said command properly anchored will kick in prey drive.

    Let’s say it is a situation where the dog needs to protect its owner. If the dog is confused the anchored command can be given which, in simple terms brings to bear the requisite drive and emotions. It’s only a matter of milliseconds from prey drive to defensive drive. The video of the black wolf going after the dog: the dog goes from prey drive as the wolf walks away and slides into fear drive, back to prey, and back to fear in moments.

    Milton Erickson type stuff.

    To clarify mine have never gone beyond what is necessary. They have never chased down a stray. They just run them off.