Forum Replies Created

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  • Sharon Blakeney-McDonald

    Member
    April 13, 2021 at 1:47 pm

    I’m not sure if I’m on the right track here but I’ve picked out the keywords to analyse the difference between IACP vs APDT. My concern with the IACP is there no enforcement for their code of conduct.

    IACP Association – depends on the members and their services to make an impact upon the profession (determined by reputation/ability).

    If members are to be best served by IACP then they need to comply with the code of conduct requirements.

    Ending with the statement being: the Association shall not and cannot be responsible for individual acts of its member.

    There are no clear definitions of which consequences will be taken if members don’t comply with the requirements of the code of conduct.

    Rule 14. Cooperate with the IACP’s President, Board of Directors or Ethics Committee (should one be assigned) on any reported violations. Following a full investigation and adjudication of any violation, the Ethics Committee will be required to make recommendations to the Board of Directors on any action that may be taken. The final decision will rest with the Board.

    How can you report a violation when one has not been assigned?

    Should one be assigned the decision rests with the board. No mention of any notification for all members of the association to be aware that the violation had been dealt with.

    If the association is relying on its member’s reputations/abilities then those members need to know they are being protected by the code of conduct being enforce from others not complying and abiding by the code of conduct.

    ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

    APTD was created to set forth guidelines for members. However, any members are subject to termination of membership.

    APTD Association gives consequences to those who do not follow their guidelines of conduct.

    They also put forth ethical principles with LIMA where the majority of dog training professionals philosophy would be in agreement, regardless of training methods and tools maximize the ability to uphold a Code of Ethics.

  • Sharon Blakeney-McDonald

    Member
    January 14, 2021 at 4:38 am

    This test results should be put forth to those that are banning e-collars. There are 3 states in Australia where e-collar are already banned. I’m fortunate to be in a state that’s it’s not but with time I’m sure it will be.

  • Sharon Blakeney-McDonald

    Member
    May 8, 2018 at 2:17 am

    Hi Dave, it may be time to teach your dog control training of obedience and to not correct the aggression but give alternative command/behaviour for your dog to do. Instead correct your dog for not doing the command/behaviour and not for showing the aggression. A dog cannot do both behaviour be aggressive and do alternative behaviour/command. With protection dogs they need to learn drills that you are in control of when he is allow to be aggressive and when he is not. I do a car drills with my protection dog Ara and the only time she is allow to show aggression is on my command or when I’m being threatened. Here a vid of a car rage drill using a hidden sleeve I do with Ara but please note my dog is tie on a leash in the car for the decoy safety. Of course Ara has gone through the complete protection dog training phrases to reach this level in her protection work. Please don’t attempt doing this until you have done all the phrases of training shown here on this site and have gone to a professional dog trainer who specialises in protection dog training. Hopefully Mike will chime in with his advice. I’m not a dog trainer and am giving you information on what I learnt to do with my own protection dog. I just like to mention too with regards to using the vibration function of the ecollar that I was taught to use the vibration as a conditioned reinforcer as a cue through it being a marker of a reward is coming and the stim as the aversive if a refusal does occur. (this pager (vibration) method is a 3mth programme I learnt as I’m interested in learning to teach deaf dogs too) I was never taught to use the vibration function to be a correction and found the pager method meant I rarely ever have to use the stimulus of the ecollar in my training but it is there only as a backup in emergency. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-o6B0-xv9xs

  • Sharon Blakeney-McDonald

    Member
    August 13, 2017 at 1:09 am

    Nice… nice to see him reinforcing the behaviour with lots of patient, love and patting.

  • Sharon Blakeney-McDonald

    Member
    July 28, 2017 at 2:48 am

    I’m not a professional but I agree with you and yes the grey dog was trying to protect…. its what I’ve learned is called splitting.

     

  • Sharon Blakeney-McDonald

    Member
    July 13, 2017 at 1:15 pm

    Hi Sabrina, Dogs that suffer with separation anxiety can show many different signs of destructive behaviour such as what you have mention the pacing and destroying things. Your dog spot of destruction must be the door but it also seem to be a habit problem too. Locking him in your room may be a good way to manage the problem as it prevents the behaviour you don’t want him doing as well as easing his anxiety… probably from your smell of being all around him in your room giving him the feeling of security. Have you thought of crate training him? If the underlying problem is separation anxiety you may need to address this first and put a plan in place… here a link that you may find helpful to read  https://www.dogtraining.world/start-self-help/anxiety/

     

    Anxiety

  • Sharon Blakeney-McDonald

    Member
    June 18, 2017 at 12:02 pm

    Wow, that was unreal watching the vid on Tex doing the agility course… I’ve never seen a dog weave like that through those poles. The dog just love it and so did the owner… great to see them both enjoying a fun activity together.

  • Sharon Blakeney-McDonald

    Member
    June 15, 2017 at 12:37 pm

    Hi Charlotte. I’ve had a read of the links and I can relate to what they are saying. Especially the behaviour and instincts links – same issues as my brother had with his Australian Stumpy tail cattle dog. I see you have found the prefect way to tap into your Border collie herding/chasing instinct with game of  frisbee… I’ve heard this breed is also very talent at agility sport.  Thanks for posting the links… very helpful info to know when it comes to working breeds.

  • Sharon Blakeney-McDonald

    Member
    June 6, 2017 at 11:09 am

    Oh, I’m not sure what happen there to my post… done a copy and hopefully this time it will go through ok.

    <span lang=”EN-US” style=”mso-ansi-language: EN-US;”><span style=”font-family: Calibri;”><span style=”color: #000000;”>Hi Robyn…<span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>  </span></span><span style=”color: #000000;”>I can just image how frustrated you must have felt when Radar wouldn’t come when called. My suggestion I like to offer and what I have found to be very helpful is using the pyramid of the foundation Style training. https://www.dogtraining.world/start-self-help/ </span></span></span>

    <span lang=”EN-US” style=”mso-ansi-language: EN-US;”><span style=”font-family: Calibri;”><span style=”color: #000000;”>You may find that Radar running away is fun for him as well as he gets to have a game with you too.<span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>  </span></span><span style=”color: #000000;”>Radar being adolescent and also a mixed cattle dog is a breed bred to work and they are usually high energy dogs. Games in these circumstances are very useful and can work to your advantage to ease any “restless spirit” of mental/physical simulation that Radar may have. </span></span></span>

    <span lang=”EN-US” style=”mso-ansi-language: EN-US;”><span style=”font-family: Calibri;”><span style=”color: #000000;”>There are many games you can do such as fetch, tug of war, chasing a flirt pole, etc.<span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>  </span></span><span style=”color: #000000;”>If you play with Radar then that can also be used as positive reinforcement for him obeying obedience commands. What I have done is follow Phase1 first for the behaviour I wanted my dogs to learn and then once they understood the command, I started introducing it into the games the dogs and I enjoy playing together.</span><span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”><span style=”color: #000000;”>  </span></span><span style=”color: #000000;”>Games are really good for dogs to help release any pent-up energy, for helping with impulse control and to just plain having fun with those the dog loves to be with.</span></span></span>

    <span lang=”EN-US” style=”mso-ansi-language: EN-US;”><span style=”font-family: Calibri;”><span style=”color: #000000;”>In the meantime while you are training Radar in obedience, try to avoid <span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”> </span></span><span style=”color: #000000;”>him getting </span><span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”><span style=”color: #000000;”> </span></span><span style=”color: #000000;”>opportunities to where he is able to defiant you.</span><span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”><span style=”color: #000000;”>  </span></span><span style=”color: #000000;”>I know sometimes dogs can easily escape us and as you mention Radar was the one who got loose. </span></span></span>

    <span lang=”EN-US” style=”mso-ansi-language: EN-US;”><span style=”color: #000000; font-family: Calibri;”>Training our dogs in obedience’s makes our life and their so much better and in the outside world can help us to keep them safe… I hope this of help to you.</span></span>

     

    Start Self Help

  • Sharon Blakeney-McDonald

    Member
    June 6, 2017 at 10:55 am

     
    <p style=”margin: 0cm 0cm 10pt;”><span style=”font-family: Calibri;”><span style=”color: #000000;”>Hi Robyn… <span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”> </span></span><span style=”color: #000000;”>I can just image how frustrated you must have felt when Radar wouldn’t come when called. My suggestion I like to offer and what I have found to be very helpful is using the pyramid  of the Foundation Style Training </span></span><span style=”font-family: Calibri;”><span style=”color: #000000;”>https://www.dogtraining.world/start-self-help/  </span></span></p>
     
    <p style=”margin: 0cm 0cm 10pt;”><span style=”font-family: Calibri;”><span style=”color: #000000;”>You may find that Radar running away is fun for him as well as he gets to have a game with you too. <span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”> </span></span><span style=”color: #000000;”>Radar being adolescent and also a mixed cattle dog is a breed bred to work and they are usually high energy dogs. Games in these circumstances are very useful and can work to your advantage</span></span> to ease any “restless spirit” of mental/physical simulation that Radar may have.</p>
    <p style=”margin: 0cm 0cm 10pt;”></p>
     
    <p style=”margin: 0cm 0cm 10pt;”><span style=”font-family: Calibri;”><span style=”color: #000000;”>There are many games you can do such as fetch, tug of war, chasing a flirt pole, etc.<span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>  </span></span><span style=”color: #000000;”>If you play with Radar then that can also be used as positive reinforcement for him obeying obedience commands. What I have done is follow Phase1 first for the behaviour I wanted my dogs to learn and then once they understood the command, I started introducing it into the games the dogs and I enjoy playing together.</span><span style=”color: #000000;”><span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”> </span></span><span style=”color: #000000;”>Games are really good for dogs to help release any pent-up energy, for helping with impulse control and to just plain having fun with those the dog loves to be with.</span></span></p>
     
    <p style=”margin: 0cm 0cm 10pt;”><span style=”font-family: Calibri;”><span style=”color: #000000;”>In the meantime while you are training Radar in obedience, try to avoid him getting any opportunities to where he is able to defiant you. <span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”> </span></span><span style=”color: #000000;”>I know sometimes dogs can easily escape us and as you mention Radar was the one who got loose. </span></span></p>
     
    <p style=”margin: 0cm 0cm 10pt;”><span style=”color: #000000; font-family: Calibri;”>Training our dogs in obedience’s makes our life and their so much better and in the outside world can help us to keep them safe… I hope this is of some help to you.</span></p>
     
    <p style=”margin: 0cm 0cm 10pt;”><span style=”color: #7030a0;”><span style=”font-family: Calibri;”> </span></span></p>
     

     

  • Sharon Blakeney-McDonald

    Member
    May 26, 2017 at 1:20 am

    Unfortunately this dog had no training and his prey drive was extreme. I often thought this dog would have been great on a cattle station if train in herding and was not the right type of dog for unexperienced dog owner as my brother was. Your dog charging at the Bichon may not necessarily have been prey drive though her first reaction was offence when she spotted him. I found with one of my dogs that was well trained I had to catch him before he when into drive otherwise once he was in drive I couldn’t stop the action from happening. Some dogs just don’t like other dogs but that’s ok as long as they learn to ignore them without attacking. Some people can be the same where they too don’t like people.

    With your knowledge of working with dogs and if your planning to train phrase3 (remote collar) will give you better control for those emergencies situations when your dog is off leash. Teaching a “leave it” command to disengage I found to be very beneficial in those circumstances too.

    All the best to you with your training of her… please do keep us posted with your progress.

  • Sharon Blakeney-McDonald

    Member
    May 24, 2017 at 1:11 am

    My brother use to own an Australian Stumpy Tail Cattle dog and it had extreme prey drive. He chase anything that move… dogs, animals, kids, riding bicycles, cars, etc.  As soon as he spotted movement he was gone at 100 miles per hr and it was impossible to catch him in a surprise situation. You could never let him off the leash on walks or out in public. After he attacked, knocked it over or caught it and it would stop moving he would walk away like nothing happen. It was definitely predatory aggression trigger by his prey drive (instinct). I wished I knew what I know now and train him in the foundation style training and did impulse control exercises with him. I could have save by brother a lot of heartache of having to surrender him after my brother received three warnings from his dog attacking in predatory aggression.

  • Sharon Blakeney-McDonald

    Member
    May 21, 2017 at 1:07 am

    Hi Dave, Do you mean by “cat like” your dog as hostile relationship with other dogs and chases them? Reading about your breed of dog I understand it is a herding breed and it may have react on instinct if she wasn’t startle by the Bishon Frise dog. Also a Bishon dog could be difficult for other dogs to realise it’s a dog or to read it’s body language especially when it’s been cut and groom and looks like a powder puff. (I use to have one as it was going to end up homeless). With lack of early socialisation and your dog at the age of adolescent (hormones kicking in and a time period of testing others in their World) could be other contributing factors to your dog not getting along well with dogs. Muzzle may be advisable as her first reaction seem to be offence to attack when an unexpected situation occurs with another dog. It sound like you are doing a great job with her training and of being in the leadership role. Your idea of taking her out with other clients dogs on walks is a really good idea to help further to socialise her with many different dogs as possible. Have you read up about the breed she is?… It seem important this breed does receive earlier socialisation and it will help to explain most of your dog behavior too by what breed type she is.

     

  • Sharon Blakeney-McDonald

    Member
    May 17, 2017 at 9:31 am

    Hi Judy… Thanks for vid, I was wondering where it was… thanks also for the further advice and information too.

  • Sharon Blakeney-McDonald

    Member
    May 16, 2017 at 12:07 pm

    When dealing with aggression issues muzzle are advisable for the safety of others. I just like to mention here in case you are not aware of it the first step to using a muzzle is conditioning a dog to wearing it. Mike use to have a vid on here how to do this but I couldn’t find it. In phrase 2 training with a halter is a similar vid where Teresa show you how to condition the pup to wearing the halter instead. I have in the past given it a try of desensitisation a reactive dog I use to owned but I found it very difficult at times to avoid unexpected situations that would trigger him off to react. For desensitisation and counter-conditioning to work your dog need many successful repetitions where it will only take one time for your dog to react that set your training back. Doing this in a “reactive dog class” does give you the control environment that would prevent this happening. Hopefully Mike will spot our conversation and can give us his input on how best for you to manage the situation if you are not in a position to be able to attend classes.

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