• Sharon Blakeney-McDonald Blakeney-McDonald

    Member
    June 6, 2017 at 11:09 am
    167

    Oh, I’m not sure what happen there to my post… done a copy and hopefully this time it will go through ok.

    <span lang=”EN-US” style=”mso-ansi-language: EN-US;”><span style=”font-family: Calibri;”><span style=”color: #000000;”>Hi Robyn…<span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>  </span></span><span style=”color: #000000;”>I can just image how frustrated you must have felt when Radar wouldn’t come when called. My suggestion I like to offer and what I have found to be very helpful is using the pyramid of the foundation Style training. https://www.dogtraining.world/start-self-help/ </span></span></span>

    <span lang=”EN-US” style=”mso-ansi-language: EN-US;”><span style=”font-family: Calibri;”><span style=”color: #000000;”>You may find that Radar running away is fun for him as well as he gets to have a game with you too.<span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>  </span></span><span style=”color: #000000;”>Radar being adolescent and also a mixed cattle dog is a breed bred to work and they are usually high energy dogs. Games in these circumstances are very useful and can work to your advantage to ease any “restless spirit” of mental/physical simulation that Radar may have. </span></span></span>

    <span lang=”EN-US” style=”mso-ansi-language: EN-US;”><span style=”font-family: Calibri;”><span style=”color: #000000;”>There are many games you can do such as fetch, tug of war, chasing a flirt pole, etc.<span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>  </span></span><span style=”color: #000000;”>If you play with Radar then that can also be used as positive reinforcement for him obeying obedience commands. What I have done is follow Phase1 first for the behaviour I wanted my dogs to learn and then once they understood the command, I started introducing it into the games the dogs and I enjoy playing together.</span><span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”><span style=”color: #000000;”>  </span></span><span style=”color: #000000;”>Games are really good for dogs to help release any pent-up energy, for helping with impulse control and to just plain having fun with those the dog loves to be with.</span></span></span>

    <span lang=”EN-US” style=”mso-ansi-language: EN-US;”><span style=”font-family: Calibri;”><span style=”color: #000000;”>In the meantime while you are training Radar in obedience, try to avoid <span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”> </span></span><span style=”color: #000000;”>him getting </span><span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”><span style=”color: #000000;”> </span></span><span style=”color: #000000;”>opportunities to where he is able to defiant you.</span><span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”><span style=”color: #000000;”>  </span></span><span style=”color: #000000;”>I know sometimes dogs can easily escape us and as you mention Radar was the one who got loose. </span></span></span>

    <span lang=”EN-US” style=”mso-ansi-language: EN-US;”><span style=”color: #000000; font-family: Calibri;”>Training our dogs in obedience’s makes our life and their so much better and in the outside world can help us to keep them safe… I hope this of help to you.</span></span>

     

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